Eggs and oranges

In years gone by, eggs and oranges were a typical gift brought for relatives and friends in hospital. After visiting hours were over, nursing staff gathered up all the eggs and oranges. The next day, nursing staff would squeeze the oranges and cook the eggs for the patients in the...

The Goodna Explosion

Whilst being interviewed about his impending retirement by The Queensland Times, Dr Trumpy was asked to comment about some of the most memorable incidents he managed. One incident he recalled was ‘The Goodna Explosion’ at St Patricks Convent School at Goodna in 1943. During this time it was not uncommon to find unexploded shells in the vicinity of the army camps and in this instance two boys came across the shell whilst walking in a paddock and decided to take it to school to show their classmates. At the end of school the boys were showing some friends and unfortunately they dropped it under the school building and it exploded injuring 8 children. Three ambulance cars brought the children to Ipswich Hospital where there was only Dr Trumpy and two resident medical officers, one of whom had contracted mumps. (The treatment of mumps at this time was the application of a hot antiphlogistine poultice to the affected jaw tied in a knot on the top of the head). The resident duly went to work with the poultice in place. Dr Trumpy operated on the children throughout the night and was deeply saddened when one of the children succumbed to their injuries. Memorial plaque at St Francis Xavier School (previously St Patrick’s) at Goodna, to commemorate the schoolboy who died as a result of injuries sustained in the bomb explosion. Photo courtesy of Councillor Paul...

Glass syringes

Glass syringes and stainless steel needles were the standard supply. Nursing staff were responsible for the maintenance, cleaning and sterilizing of the se items. As the needles were re-usable, prior to cleaning and sterilising, thin guide wires would have to be introduced through the needle to ensure patency. The needles were also checked to ensure that there were no ‘snags’ and nurses would test for this using a piece of gauze. If a nurse dropped and broke a glass syringe, they were responsible for paying for the replacement...

Dr Trumpy with Peter Merrell

A colour photograph of Dr Trumpy, former Medical Superintendent of Ipswich Hospital, holding in his arms a small boy with a stethoscope draped around his neck hangs in the AE Wilcox Museum, Ipswich Hospital. The boy is Peter Merrell, and from the expression of the faces of the doctor and young patient it is evident that there is a fine rapport between them. The photograph was taken in 1960 by Nurse Beth Sneyd, daughter of well-known sports photographer for the Brisbane Telegraph Bill Sneyd, when Peter, as a two-year-old, was a patient in the former Sunshine Children’s Ward, Ipswich Hospital. – taken from The Ipswich Hospital 1860 – 1991 by Ross Patrick,...
Nurse Goody-Two-Shoes

Nurse Goody-Two-Shoes

Nurse Goody Two-Shoes was mascot of the David Trumpy Paediatric Unit from 1979 to the late 2000s. Her uniform is a replica of that worn by nurses at Ipswich Hospital from the late 1960s through to the 1990s. She was loved by the many children who passed through the ward and their families. However, she was the brunt of many a caustic comment from tired and hard-worked paediatric nurses at the end of their day as her appearance remains cool, uncrushed and with determination in her...